You screech into the library parking lot, race up to the doors and … they’re locked! Nooooo! Your books are due today­ – what are you going to do? Never fear, book drop is here!

To the right of the main library entrance is a small silver door. If your library checkouts are all books, open the door, slide a book in, and shut the door. You’ll hear a blissful thud as it drops gently into our special spring-loaded, carpet-lined bin. Another silver, “books only”, bin sits at curbside in case you’re in a hurry.

“But I have movies and audiobooks! I’m not supposed to put them in the book drop … right?  The sticker on the box says not to put it in the book return.”
That sticker is quite literal! It really means no items with discs or cassettes in the return box for books. But we wouldn’t leave you out in the cold with nary a place for audiovisual goodies. The solution is our blue audiovisual drop at the curb! “But what about a book with a disc inside? What then?” If a book has a cd inside the cover please return it in the silver book returns. A word to the wise: Always return books to their designated silver drops and CDs/movies to the blue audiovisual drop. This prevents damage to disks and a $1.00 fine (per item in the wrong drop box) on your library account!

“My items are due today – if I return them in the book drop after closing won’t they be late?”
We empty the drops once in the morning and once in the afternoon, Monday through Saturday. If you return your item after the library closes, we’ll check it in the next morning using the previous day’s date. For example, if you return a book to the drop after closing on Tuesday, we’ll check it in Wednesday morning using Tuesday’s date. Since the Palmer Library is closed on Sunday, all items in the drops are checked in Monday morning as though they were returned the previous Saturday. If the library is closed for a holiday, items are checked in using the last date we were open. "Is there a charge for this amazing time traveling service?", you ask? Why, no! It’s all part of our outstanding, free customer service.

“Can I return books from other libraries to the Palmer return boxes?”
Yes, IF they’re from libraries within our network. Those include, but aren’t limited to: Anchorage, UAA/MatSu, MatSu Borough, and Wasilla libraries. You’ll find a complete list of network libraries here.  Not included in this super-duper list of returnable awesomeness: school, church, and bible college library materials, Redbox or Netflix movies, or Aunt Gertrude’s odd collection of savory gelatin recipes.

“The library is open, but I’ll put these books in the curb drop on my way in to check out some more.”  
Please bring returns inside during library business hours, if possible, especially if you plan to check out more items. If all 20 items, of the 20-item limit, are sitting in the outside book drop you won’t be able to check out any more! The inside book return is located under the front counter on your left as you enter the main library room. We check it constantly throughout the day. You’re welcome to return both books and audiovisual materials there. Returning your items inside allows us to get them checked in immediately, keeping your account clear and ready for another round of rip roaring reading, listening, and watching adventures. It'll also give you the added satisfaction of saving a librarian’s back!
~KR
 
 
Halloween transformed some of our staff into....

Disney's Haunted Mansion, where 999 happy haunts reside! From her eerie portraits to the signs welcoming "Foolish Mortals", and warning of "Hitchhiking Ghosts, to the flickering floating candles and cracking plaster, this was one fun ensemble. "There's always room for 1 more ghost at the Haunted Mansion". Any...volunteers?"

We were also visited by a pair of wise and cunning gypsy ladies...ready to recommend dangerously fortuitous adventures for your reading pleasure.
 
 
It's that time of year again in Alaska when animals and humans alike are prone to hibernate. Our staff picks for October all have one thing in common: they are good in bed!
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The Shadow of the Wind
by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

A boy named Daniel selects a novel from a library of rare books, enjoying it so much that he searches for the rest of the author's works, only to discover that someone is destroying every book the author has ever written.

"Just the best. Something you look forward to reading." - Crystal

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The Ruins  of Gorlan
by John Flanagan

When fifteen-year-old Will is rejected by battleschool, he becomes the reluctant apprentice to the mysterious Ranger Halt, and winds up protecting the kingdom from danger.

"An epic adventure any age would enjoy dreaming about." - Heidi


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At Home in Mitford Series
by Jan Karon

Rich comedy series about ordinary people and their ordinary lives set in a charming village with pure air and high, green hills.

"Calm, slow-paced stories packed with warmth and humor." -Kaitlin

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Pajama time!
by Sandra Boynton

Good-night book with an irresistible cast of characters.

"Grandkids favorite!" - Teri


 
 
A library is not just a building where groups of people come find a book. A library is where individuals socialize, attend free interactive programs, check out materials for relaxation or learning, work on resumes, homework, or recreational projects. In many instances, a visit to the library requires more individual assistance from staff than a simple welcome. Comparing a library to any other business is not a true reflection of a library's function in the community.

Comparisons of similar size Alaska libraries, including the Mat Su Borough Libraries, shows Palmer Library is very competitive when considering our smaller numbers for budget, library size and full-time employees (FTEs).  Although Palmer’s customer service resources are smaller than similar libraries, it’s very competitive in circulation, programs and patron visits. One could say doing more with less applies to the Palmer Library! 


Did you know?...you can now pay library fines online with a credit or debit card through the card catalog. Not sure how? Find a tutorial HERE.
Did you know?...Palmer Library staff undergoes regular customer service training. We can't top other libraries for budget, space, or staff, but we strive to provide the best customer service in the state!
Did you know?...A library card gives you free access to all the materials in the Palmer Library, plus online books and audiobooks, as well as most other library collections in the state, and special requests out of state!
Stop in the Palmer Library today, with your photo ID,
to sign up.
~HD/BS
 
 
We've been reading all things Alaska in honor of the upcoming Alaska Day, Wednesday, October 18, 2017, commemorating the Sesquicentennial of the Transfer of Alaska.
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Alone in the Wilderness
by Dick Proenneke & Bob Swerer

The account of the day-to-day explorations and activities of Dick Proenneke as he built a cabin in the remote wilderness of the Twin Lakes Region of Alaska.

"The quintessential DVD of Alaska adventure living." - Heidi


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And She Was
by Cindy Dyson

A tense interplay between past and present that explores Aleut history, taboos, mummies, conquest, survival, and the seamy side of the 1980s in a fishing boomtown at the edge of the world. It leaps across time and culture to a lost woman, who more than anything needs to understand the gray shades between heroism and evil, between freedom and bondage, between this place and the rest of her life.

"Takes place in two eras." - Crystal

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DANGER the Dog Yard Cat
by Libby Riddles with Shelley Gill

Libby Riddles was the first woman to win the 1049 mile Iditarod sled dog race. She introduces us to her cat, Danger, in this whimsical tale of the far north.

- Jessie

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The Smell of Other People's Houses
by Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock

Growing up in Alaska in the 1970s isn't like growing up anywhere else. Four vivid voices tell intertwining stories of hardship, tragedy, wild luck, and salvation.

"Young adult book that beautifully illustrates the importance of perseverance---'sometimes you just have to hold onto whatever you can'." - Kate

 

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Into the Wild
by John Krakkauer

In April 1992 Christopher Johnson McCandless hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild.

"Good, true story." - Katie

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Pipeline
by Ron Dalby

An overworked detective, a dedicated game warden, and a veteran bush pilot team up to save a kidnapped child and prevent a monumental environmental disaster in the heart of Alaska’s sweeping wilderness.

"All the elements of a good, fictional mystery."- Laura

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Honey Buckets on the Kuskokwim
by Helen Youngsman Teeter

"Hilarious and often poignant story of two Alaska missionaries."
- Kaitlin



~KT
 
 
This is just a little shameless promotion for one of our newer adult oriented library programs! The library's Open Room craft day on Sunday, 9/10 had a great turn out. There were quilting, sewing, model car building, scrapbooking, card making, and crafting projects all over the room. Anyone, ages 15 and up, is welcome to bring a project to work on, or just pop in with a cup of coffee to chat! We have all kinds of good clean...albeit messy...fun, conversation, and project progress. The library provides the tables, chairs, heat, lights, outlets, pleasant atmosphere, and free WiFi! You provide your own project materials, ideas, conversation, coffee, and body counts (for statistical purposes only, of course). There are three opportunities each month to get in on the excitement! One Sunday, and every other Wednesday. Check our calendar for dates. pplak.org/calendar
(Faces have been avoided to protect the crafty.)
~HD
 
 
Here are a few of our reading picks from August. As Fall approaches and we resume more regular school and work routines, we were thinking about growing up and some of life's greatest lessons, such as dealing with bullying, overcoming adversity, things we wish we knew then or that we  need to be reminded of now and of course life's greatest lesson of all -- handling the inevitable loss of someone we hold dear. Enjoy!
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Chrysanthemum
by Kevin Henkes

Chrysanthemum loves her name, until she starts going to school and the other children make fun of it.


"A perennial favorite in my house." - Heidi

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Everything I Need to Know I Learned from a Little Golden Book
by Diane Muldrow

An adult refresher course from the more than 70-year-old line of children's books which covered real-life situations - from managing money, to the importance of exercise, to finding contentment in the simplest things.

A humorous "guide to life" for grown-ups! - Crystal

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The Harry Potter Series
by J.K. Rowling

A series that captivated readers of all ages as they witnessed a most extraordinary young boy, and perhaps the greatest fictional wizard of all time, face the ordinary challenges of growing up.

"Navigating
the trials and triumphs of school, friends, evil wizards, love interests, you know, the norm." - Kaitlin

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50 Rules Kids Won't Learn in School : Real World Antidotes to Feel-Good Education
by Charles J. Sykes

Identifies fifty life lessons about surviving in the real world that parents can use for a range of constructive benefits, in a primer that features such tips as "Life is not fair. Get used to it" and "Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity."

"My personal favorite is Rule 48: Tell yourself the story of your life. Have a point." - Kate

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OPTION B
by Sheryl Sandberg & Adam Grant

A powerful, inspiring, and practical book about finding resilience and moving forward after life's inevitable setbacks.

"Optimistic and inspiring read on a tough subject - grieving the loss of a loved one - and how family and friends can really help." - Teri

~KT
 
 
Staff spent the winter of 2016-2017 dressing up one day a month to chase away those winter blues!  Each month we chose a new theme. Click HERE to see all the silly fun!  This winter, we'll be posting dress up days on the blog. Dress up with us and you'll be featured here too!  Check the calendar for dates.
~HD
 
 
Shelves and shelves of books, movies, and audiobooks each wearing a red and white sticker that proudly proclaims “NEW.” What counts as a new item? When does a library book or movie stop being new? Follow us on this behind-the-scenes peek at the workings of the Palmer Public Library, as we go on the hunt for NEW!

New items come to the Palmer Library several different ways. The staff are constantly checking the New York Times Bestseller list, choosing the most popular current titles to purchase for the library. Patrons are welcome to suggest movies, books, or audiobooks via our “Suggested Purchase Form” at pplak.org/suggest-a-purchase and we’ll consider adding it to our collection. Other items that will find their way to our “New” sections include popular classics that aren’t in the collection, older titles that being made into movies, movies & TV series, donations of recently published titles, and any items uniquely relevant to Palmer Library patrons, such as Alaskana and books by local authors.

Each new book, movie, or audiobook is marked with a NEW sticker and the month/year the title was added to the library collection. The item is shelved in one of the New sections until the same month the following year. For example, if we added the item in September 2016, we will move it to the regular collection in September 2017.

Why doesn’t an item coming in to the library make it to the New shelf? If we receive a replacement for a lost or damaged item that is not currently popular or recently published, it will either go straight to our regular collection, or Friends of the Library book sale. If we already own the title and are simply adding another copy to the system, it may bypass the New section as well.

New books will have a shorter checkout period, (2 weeks,) than older books (4 weeks), since the new items will be in higher demand. Movies are always a 1 week checkout, regardless of their New status. While an item is listed as New in the system, Alaska Library Catalog network libraries outside the Mat-Su Borough won’t be able to place a hold on it, giving Palmer patrons increased access to the new material.

If you’ve never noticed the New sections at the Palmer Public Library, check it out next time you come in! Our staff are happy to direct you to one of several places New items are kept, including Adult Fiction/Nonfiction, Young Adult Fiction, Manga, Anime, & Graphic Novels, Large Print, Audiobooks, Juvenile Fiction, Juvenile Nonfiction, Easy Readers, and Movies. Stop in and see what’s NEW today!
~KR